And Apple said… NO :(

Hi everyone,

Yes, finally Apple answered and sadly said NO :(. I have been sending and receiving several mails to and from Apple these days, but finally I think I have to surrender :(.

This is the exact last answer:

Processor state and low level system functionality is the domain of the operating system and should not be under user control.

Users who wish to use your product can still do so by booting into OS X’s Recovery OS and issuing one command, as detailed in the System Integrity Protection Guide.

Yes! It speaks by itself. I really never thought that Apple would deny the signature. I told them the app has thousands of users (the free version does :), but that seemed to make no effect. So… what to do next? These are the options and the next steps:

1.- If you really don’t want to mess with the system integrity features and continue using TBS normally, just don’t upgrade to El Capitan.

2.- Next version will include a feature to check the system integrity status calling the command provided by Apple, and instructions in order to disable it.

Please, give me your feedback about your experience on disabling the system integrity features if you’re currently trying it.

And…if you have another ideas, I’m all ears! Just comment out in this blog… :D, but for now, that will be the path to follow. I’ve sent a last appeal to Apple, but I really don’t have hope about they’re just considering it.

8 comments on “And Apple said… NO :(
  1. Can Margarini says:

    dam :/ I understand why they would say no. but it really does suck.

  2. Sergey says:

    That is sad 🙁 We have to mess with all that SIP stuff just to run our benchmarks. Apple devs should be able to somehow disable TB for their internal benchmarking. Are they disabling SIP or use some internal signed driver? I think, the first option is just ridiculous, so they must be using some internal tool. It’s unfair to disallowing others to develop such tool while not bundling theirs internal one into xcode tools.

    Apple is so Apple, next week they may decide that controlling the display brightness is too much freedom for you, since this allows almost direct interaction with bulb hardware in your display 🙂

  3. Jaq Andrews says:

    Just downloaded on a MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2011) with a 1.8 GHz Intel Core i7 running El Capitan 10.11.4. Turbo Boost Switcher ran fine, even with System Integrity Protection enabled. The processor never went over 1.8GHz, according to the Intel Power Gadget.

  4. Guillaume says:

    Hey there !

    Thanks for your awesome work, I appreciate it a lot to keep my fan from roaring too often.

    Don’t worry about SIP, I deactivated that feature as soon as I upgraded to 10.11, horribly limiting the power that users can have on their systems. Sounds perfect for users who don’t mess with theirs, but I’m pretty sure that every user of TBS must have a minimum knowledge that should help her or him to deactivate SIP.

    By the way, it SIP the reason why TBS always asks for a password as soon as it tries to change TB ?

  5. Mahmood AlShafai says:

    I’ve just discovered this app

    it’s really sad when apple said no

    I really have no idea how to help you but i wish i can donate to you 🙂

  6. Matt says:

    hi,

    this sure is a sad news… :/

    I dunno what to advise, even as a user, since no serious alternative seems to offer under El Capitan (more over, the El Capitan deployment rate seems to be quite high).

    I have to say it’s not obvious for a “casual user” to understand how harmfull system integrity disabling can be, and how it should be used. For instance : should be disable it when needed, then start TBS, then “run an heavy activity”, then stop TBS, then enable again ? Or can we leave it disabled…?

    Really sorry to read this though, and good luck…

    Matt

  7. Christoph says:

    Any news on the new version? It seems that this “news” just got reposted yesterday. I’m really looking forward to the new (Pro) version (even if I have to disable SIP)

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